Ozone Action Season

What is Ozone Action Season?

During the months of March-October, our community could face unhealthy air quality levels due to an increase in ground-level ozone concentrations from single occupant vehicles. Help us avoid ozone alerts of orange or higher (see Air Quality Index below) by clean commuting all year long and adopting these behaviors during the season:

  • Wait to fuel your car until after 5 p.m.
  • Don’t top off your gas tank
  • Reduce vehicle engine idling
  • Combine errands
  • Don’t mow your lawn on Ozone Action Days

How Ozone Pollution Affects your Health

There are many adverse effects of ozone pollution on the human body. Those with pre-existing respiratory problems, children, and adults who actively exercise or work outdoors are the most at risk for these health problems. The effects of ozone on your health can include:

  • Increase in asthma irritation
  • Chest pain and difficulty  breathing
  • Narrows airways, making it harder to provide oxygen to the body
  • Aggravated/prolonged coughing
  • Increased chance of respiratory infection
  • Eye irritation

Air Quality Index (AQI)

Pollutant Breakpoints for Ozone & Fine Particles

ppm = parts per million.
μg/m3 = micrograms per cubic meter
 

NOTE: Currently, Michigan's air quality usually falls into the green 'good' or yellow 'moderate' range. Air quality across the state continues to improve. Air standards recently enacted to better protect public health are much more stringent than in the past; therefore, the number of poor air quality days is expected to increase. Air monitors will reach the orange 'unhealthy for sensitive groups' range more often and occasionally reach 'unhealthy' red levels. Real-time PM2.5 (fine particle) values are shown as running averages. Past data is re-calculated as a midnight to midnight value in order to match the federal AQI calculation criteria.

 

For more information please visit MIair, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality real-time air quality webpage.